Photographs, Prints & Postcards

The woodcut pages are printed on single sheets and then joined along the outside edge with glue. A step by step illustrated guide to how color woodcut prints are made. Using a single print “Two Beauties in a Boat” by Kiyonaga as the basis for the guide, as you go through the book a color woodblock woodcut print progresses through the various manufacturing stages to become a completed image. Each color even shades of the same color requires a different block and this is demonstrated step by step. The book contains a 4 page actually 2 folded pages introduction and the balance consists of 20 woodcuts one for each color on the left page and the resulting cumulative state of the woodblock print on the right page. The introduction is printed on thinner paper than the pages with the actual woodblock illustrations.

Signs a Man Loves and Cares for You

Hodo 40 Unfortunately I do not know much about S. Saito too , but I need further research data before I can conclude anything. In any case, his paintings were often sold via the publisher Takemura Hideo, with an accompanying sticker containing the publisher’s details on the verso. Saito is with little doubt Saito Hodo who published woodblock prints via Takemura Hideo. I have image examples of a woodblock print and a watercolour of the same scene, one signed ‘Hodo’ and the other signed ‘Saito H.

Japanese Prints Japanese Art Art Reproductions Block Prints Art Prints Traditional Art Asian Art Art Night Vintage Japanese Forward TSUCHIYA KOITSU Oban yoko-e .

Please note, many Doi seals are very similar and one needs a close look to figure out the differences. The “Doi Hangaten” publisher’s seal however comprises five characters in it’s left half, a simple fact, which assists the identification. Note–this seal is not “framed” compared to all later seals. On top of the name “Doi Teiichi” we find the four characters “hanken shoju” in a square arrangement.

C – “Triple offset boxes” arrangement. Left side, upper box reads “Doi Teiichi”, right side “hanken shoju”. Lower box left side is carver Ikeda, right side printer Yokoi. The center box mentions the printer Itoh, the lower box the carver Ikeda. It is estimated, that this seal type got used just after the war with the original blocks until approximately the mid ‘s, but there is still some continuing debate whether this seal type could be pre-war.

Almost all prints of the “E” type show the combination Harada carver and Yokoi printer , indicating that the original blocks were recut by Harada. Other prints of “Doi Hangaten” show Itoh as printer, however, no further printers are known to the author in this seal combination.

UKIYO-E Q & A

Capturing the 19th Century in Photographs: British Library Publishing, Gernsheim, Alison. Victorian and Edwardian Fashion: Phillimore, Jones, Gillian. Lancashire Professional Photographers How to Archive Family Photos:

Serge Astieres’s Japanese woodblock prints collection with overview of techniques and library in French (looks like something by Tsuchiya Koitsu) or when it was done, but it’s a gorgeous woodblock print. Find this Pin and more on Japanese Art by Susie Printmaking Japanese Dating Japanese Woodcut Japanese Prints Woodblock Print Japan Art.

The set comprises the complete six cherry wood blocks and a single Kyoto Hanga-in print made from the blocks. Five of the blocks are double-sided and one is carved on a single side. One of the blocks is carved with images for two separate colors one side of the block. A total of twelve colors were used to produce this image. The key block features all the black lines in the print, and is carved with incredible precision and fine line work. Pigments remain on the blocks, including a variety of blues and grays, yellow, red, green, and light red brown.

Paper remnants of the hanshita or preparatory drawing are still glued to some of the blocks. The colors were registered by aligning each print along an L-shaped kento mark on the lower right corner of each separate image. The set of blocks are a fascinating, rare artifact from the recent past.

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Recently a threesome of “same-image” prints came our way–of course, giving us the opportunity for a direct side-by-side comparison of these three prints. The image of which we speak is the beautifully shaded “interior view” of Eisho Narazaki’s print, “Interior of Asakusa Temple,” seen just below. NARAZAKI’s print, “Interior of Asakusa Temple” — “C-seal,” “D-seal,” and “6mm-seal” The interesting thing which was immediately noted was the different location choose for “seal placement” in the print’s two earliest states, and then, the realization that the print’s “margin-dating” which is carved into the print’s “key-block” had been carved OFF prior to the printing of the two later examples.

While we were well familiar with this practice of carving OFF a print’s “margin-dating” once a print’s “first edition” printing had been completed with respect to prints published by Unsodo Publisher, we did not immediately recall seeing this practice having been done by Watanabe Publisher. To learn more about this removal of “margin-dates” by Unsodo, please see our discussion given in our “Quick Reference” article titled “The Seals of Unsodo Han. Seemingly then, at least then in the case of this Watanabe-published print by Narazaki, Watanabe has mirrored the Unsodo Publisher’s practice of “date removal” once a print’s first edition printing is completed.

Japanese Watercolour Artists: Very little is known about the majority of the pre-war Japanese watercolour artists. It is generally accepted that the producers of early Japanese watercolours (from late Meiji to early Showa) studied the Western-style watercolour technique, with many artists also having a Western-style education.

Japan then enjoyed the security and the comforts of peace and prosperity. After a time, the middle class with a sudden excess of money but a minimum of freedom began to enjoy the “life of pleasure. Thus Ukiyo-e was born, with it’s depiction of this decadent, almost hedonistic society. Sensual courtesans dressed in the most popular and stylish costumes were portrayed and dramatic scenes from kabuki plays dominated the subject matter of the prints.

A Japanese Woodblock Print is said to be the work of the designer, but in actuality it is the combined efforts of three separate artisans — the artist, the woodblock cutter and the printer. A master artist first draws his design which is then pasted down on a finely prepared cherry woodblock. The woodblock cutter follows the lines with a sharp chisel. He uses so much skill and follows the design with such fidelity that the block, when finished, is a work of art.

Main Artist Index (K)

You can also search www. Although Julius Komjati lived most of his life in his native Hungary, the ten year period he worked and lived in London had a profound impact upon the course of British etching. Born in Hungary, Komjati was the son of an inspector of forests.

An unusually early Shotei design dating from his earliest collaboration with the publisher Watanabe. First state printing, pre-dating the great Kanto earthquake of which destroyed the blocks of the publisher. Rare. Find this Pin and more on Tsuchiya Koitsu Prints by Hanga Harbor. See more.

Values of Japanese Prints in an Appraisal – Different values for the same print?! Appraising and valuation of Japanese prints, Japanese art and Oriental art Different values for the same item!? How do you know which one is the right one for your purpose? What do the different appraisal values mean? I would like to show you the 5 most common value types in appraising Japanese prints, paintings and illustrated books.

If you want to buy a replacement for a lost item or a collection in a short time, you will go to a high-end Japanese print dealer. The price you pay is the Retail Value, this should get you a high-quality item with full guarantees of authenticity and condition. Replacement Value is normally used for insurance evaluations. Fair Market Value FMV is what a buyer would be willing to pay in a public and carefully cataloged Japanese print auction or in the open market, where both the parties have the full information about the market and the item traded.

Fair Market Value is usually used in income and estate tax valuations. We have a fairly comprehensive knowledge about rules relating to taxable values in several of the main jurisdictions as well as common inheritance issues. In reading auction results many of the items are not in good condition, late printings or sometimes even fakes.

Dating koitsu prints

Hodo 40 Unfortunately I do not know much about S. Saito too , but I need further research data before I can conclude anything. In any case, his paintings were often sold via the publisher Takemura Hideo, with an accompanying sticker containing the publisher’s details on the verso. Saito is with little doubt Saito Hodo who published woodblock prints via Takemura Hideo.

Specializing in fine Century Japanese Woodblock Prints: Koitsu, Tsuchiya – An unusually early Shotei design dating from his earliest collaboration with the publisher Watanabe. First state printing, pre-dating the great Kanto earthquake of which destroyed the blocks of the publisher.

See below Presented here is the only comprehensive hard-copy reference available for the prints of Shotei. The Folk Museum of Ota City’s “Shotei Hiroaki Takahashi” is an page catalog containing many of Shotei’s most famous shin hanga woodblock print scenes in vivid colour. It also contains a surprising number of previously unseen and exceedingly rare pre-earthquake woodblock prints published via Watanabe, as well as equally rare watercolour paintings, kuchi-e prints and even scrolls.

The table of contents and individual prints are listed in both Japanese and English, as well as several pages of text on the life and times of Shotei in Japanese. This catalog, while not a complete resource of Shotei prints, is none-the-less an invaluable reference source of his early and later works, and when used in conjunction with Marc Kahn’s virtual catalog on shotei. This catalog is out of print. According to the publisher, no more stock is available.

There is also a hard-cover Shotei catalog but it is far less comprehensive than this catalog. The contents of this reference include: Page 1 – Table to contents in both English and Japanese.

UKIYO-E Q & A

Erick Kristian Men show love in many different ways. Each man is unique and expresses love in his own way. In the everyday interaction between men and women, there are some pretty interesting differences. Men often like to hold hands or even help around the house when they get those loving feelings for you.

On Sunday, November 18, Turner Auctions + Appraisals is pleased to present the Kappy Hendricks Collection of Japanese Prints. The sale features over lots from the personal collection of Mrs. Hendricks, a long-time enthusiast, expert and gallery owner of Japanese prints.

Literally “thousand shrine slip”. These are said to be remnants of ancient beliefs in the the power of words combined with pilgrimages. Rebecca Salter in her Japanese Popular Prints: From Votive Slips to Playing Cards p. In Japan, it was recommended to write the kanji for ‘tiger’ on the palm of the hand to terrify wild animals and evil spirits. It shows the senjafuda attached to one of the entryway pillars to the Zenko-ji.

In Hepburn’s dictionary – first published in – it defines this term as “A sort of imaginary beings, who live amongst the mountains; genii, fairy. However, most modern dictionaries define it as hermit or wizard. They had psychic powers and could levitate. He is one of the rishi or sennin sien nung , beings endowed with supernatural powers who enjoy rest for a period after death, being for a time exempt from transmigration Bukan Zenjin is always accompanied by a tiger

How to Identify Authentic Japanese woodblock print